Living Gratefully

thank you boy

Every Monday, I’ll post about discovering genuine hope and authentic answers for living a healthy life.

Is living gratefully a choice? Is it different from being grateful?

Last Monday, I posted about how the character qualities of self-respect, self-control, and respect for others are related to meeting our five core needs in healthy ways. Research suggests gratitude and joy give birth to these three.

To some extent, living gratefully is a choice. It’s rooted in certain thinking patterns, though, and without being exposed to those, it would be hard (if not impossible) to be grateful consistently.

If we want children to be grateful, we need to be grateful. But, we shouldn’t assume they’ll figure out why we are grateful from just hearing us say “thank you” occasionally. They might adopt the pattern of saying it, but it will mean their gratefulness is rooted in circumstances instead of beliefs. If we talk about our beliefs and thinking patterns, there’s a greater likelihood they’ll adopt them. That’s powerful!

The thinking patterns are also essential if we’re going to live gratefully and not just be grateful when something occurs. Self-respect, self-control, and respect for others won’t be birthed by circumstantial gratitude. They will be birthed within children and adults who live gratefully.

What beliefs or thinking patterns that result in living gratefully would you add to this list? When we’re grateful:

  • We are more aware of what we have than what we don’t have, what we know than what we don’t know, where we’ve been than where we’d like to go, etc.
  • We acknowledge the differences between our wants and our needs.
  • We don’t compare ourselves and our things to others and decide whether to be grateful based on our comparison.
  • We know there’s more than material possessions to be grateful for. Many of us are first and foremost grateful for our relationship with God. We are also grateful for people to love and people who love us.
  • We are grateful our daily, practical needs are met. We don’t take it for granted or have an attitude of, “I deserve this.”
  • We are grateful for talents, strengths, challenges that mature us, and so much more.
  • We say “thank you” and do things to express gratitude without expecting anything in return.

Which is it for you? Are you living gratefully or being grateful? Neither? Any changes you want to make? Go for it!

(Watch for more about gratitude next Monday.)

Dr. Kathy Koch is the President of Celebrate Kids, Inc. in Fort Worth, TX. She is also the author of How Am I Smart? A Parent’s Guide to Multiple Intelligences. If you would like Kathy to come and be a speaker at your next training event or conference, click here to learn more about how to bring her expertise into your sphere of influence.

Please note: I reserve the right to delete comments that are offensive or off-topic.

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