Diana Waring Interviews “Self Smart”

Two weeks ago, I wrote about people smart and I shared Diana Waring’s important video explaining this smart. When we’re being people smart, we think with other people.  We know what we know when we hear ourselves say it to someone else and hear their response.

Children who have people-smart strengths prefer group work and are excellent brainstormers. They can also understand others well as they read and respond to body language and facial feedback. Therefore, as I wrote in that blog, it’s a very important smart for school and life.

Today’s blog and Diana’s video are about self smart – the smart that’s the opposite of people smart. When we’re being self smart, we think deeply inside of ourselves. We reflect on our ideas and experiences. As a result, we can be quiet in learning situations and sometimes appear to be slow. Deep thinking can’t be rushed. We may choose to have fewer friends than others.

Because children with self-smart strengths are comfortable with their own thoughts, they can be quite independent. Diana does a great job, as always, of summarizing other strengths of this smart. It’s good to keep in mind that too much of a good thing isn’t a good thing. This is a core teaching of Celebrate Kids and it’s worth mentioning now.

Also, it’s important to awaken this smart early and strengthen it because it’s the smart we use for understanding ourselves. If you think of times when you don’t understand yourself and how you feel, you’ll be face-to-face with how important this smart is. I’m concerned it’s being awakened later because of technology use. Children aren’t used to being quiet and they don’t prioritize knowing themselves. Rather, they want others to know and affirm them.

As with the other videos, enjoy it and benefit from it. Watch it with children so they have a new way of understanding themselves. You’ll have plenty to talk about. I’m so glad you care!

Diana’s Biographical Sketch

Diana Waring is one of the pioneers of homeschooling. For nearly three decades she has been an author and speaker to the international homeschool movement. Diana is the author and publisher of the History Revealed curriculum, the Experience History Through Music series (William T. Anderson authored one of the titles in this series), Beyond Survival, Reaping the Harvest, and numerous world history and homeschool encouragement audio CDs. She is a video blogger, blogger, columnist for The Homeschool Minute, guest writer at The Old Schoolhouse magazine, curriculum writer, singer/composer, actress/playwright, wife, and homeschool mom. To learn more, please visit www.DianaWaring.com

Diana Waring Interviews “Music Smart”

I’m so glad you’re interested in multiple intelligences. Diana Waring is glad, too. If you’ve read the last several blogs and watched her videos, what do you and your children most appreciate? We pray you remember that. I don’t write blogs and she doesn’t produce videos because we have nothing else to do. We want to influence you!

Did you benefit from learning that children, teens, and adults who are good with color and design are picture smart? They’re not just creative? Many find this encouraging. There are similarities in the emphasis of today’s intelligence – music smart.

People good at keeping a rhythm, singing in tune, playing an instrument, and recognizing musical selections are music smart. These people aren’t just musical or talented. They’re music smart.

Although you may think that being music smart can’t help with academics, that’s not true. Kids who enjoy music can use it to motivate them to study other topics. For all children, the experience will be richer. For instance, check out Diana’s “Experience History Through Music” CDs.

When I taught second graders, I loved using songs like she includes on her “Westward Ho” CD. And, now, I’d use the songs on her “Musical Memories of Laura Ingalls Wilder.” Some would enjoy the songs more than others, but no one would be hurt by my choice to use them.

If I asked you how to spell Mississippi, I’m sure you’d spell it with the rhythm. And, what about the ABCs? Entire auditoriums full of high schoolers have sung them to me? They laugh after a few letters. I didn’t have to tell them to sing the ABCs. They just naturally did. Music is remembered a long time. What if we suggested that children put multiplication tables to music? Bible verses? More? Music helps academics in these ways.

And, there’s more. Let me suggest that some children may stay in school because of their love of music. If it wasn’t for band, orchestra, or choir, they may drop out or give up and disengage entirely. That would be tragic. When these children discover they’re smart and that’s why music is important to them or comes naturally to them, they’ll be encouraged even more.

Beyond school, being music smart can enhance life. It influences what some of us do with our spare time. Worshiping with music may be a very important part of church for you. Music can also strengthen friendships and families as you go to concerts together, perform together, and enjoy talking about your favorite groups or songs.

What if you took time to talk with your children about being more music smart tomorrow than they are today? Watch Diana’s video first, though, because she’ll give you great content to discuss. I love the variety of music she mentions and her list of careers. Enjoy!

Diana’s Biographical Sketch

Diana Waring is one of the pioneers of homeschooling. For nearly three decades she has been an author and speaker to the international homeschool movement. Diana is the author and publisher of the History Revealed curriculum, the Experience History Through Music series (William T. Anderson authored one of the titles in this series), Beyond Survival, Reaping the Harvest, and numerous world history and homeschool encouragement audio CDs. She is a video blogger, blogger, columnist for The Homeschool Minute, guest writer at The Old Schoolhouse magazine, curriculum writer, singer/composer, actress/playwright, wife, and homeschool mom. To learn more, please visit www.DianaWaring.com

Diana Waring Interviews “People Smart”

Teaching people about their eight great smarts is always fun and meaningful. Why? People are encouraged and surprised as they learn valuable truths about themselves and others.

One of the biggest surprises occurs when I teach about the smart we’re focusing on today – people smart. Most people don’t realize it’s an intelligence. I think it might be the most important one. Does that surprise you?

I refer to two of the smarts as “school smarts” because they’re so associated with the way we teach and learn – word and logic. Because of their relevance to lots of learning, these are certainly important.

But, think about it. As you’ll hear Diana Waring explain in her video, when we’re being people smart, we understand people, we listen well, and we can lead, persuade, and influence others. We’re also able to understand how others see the world. If more children and adults had strengths in this smart, wouldn’t we all be better off? Certainly.

Let’s prioritize raising children who are people smart. Diana will help you. Enjoy her video and watch it with your children.

Diana’s Biographical Sketch

Diana Waring is one of the pioneers of homeschooling. For nearly three decades she has been an author and speaker to the international homeschool movement. Diana is the author and publisher of the History Revealed curriculum, the Experience History Through Music series (William T. Anderson authored one of the titles in this series), Beyond Survival, Reaping the Harvest, and numerous world history and homeschool encouragement audio CDs. She is a video blogger, blogger, columnist for The Homeschool Minute, guest writer at The Old Schoolhouse magazine, curriculum writer, singer/composer, actress/playwright, wife, and homeschool mom. To learn more, please visit www.DianaWaring.com

Diana Waring Interviews “Number Smart”

Let’s continue our series of posts using Diana Waring’s videos about the 8 Great Smarts with another video. She and I are both glad you’ve landed here.

You may or may not be aware that the “father” of multiple intelligences is Dr. Howard Gardner, a brilliant man affiliated with Harvard University. He titled the smart Diana interviews on this video “logical-mathematical intelligence.”

A colleague of his who I greatly respect, Dr. Thomas Armstrong, took Dr. Gardner’s work and made it more accessible. One way he did this was to simplify Dr. Gardner’s terms. For a while this intelligence was referred to by some people  as “number smart.” Dr. Armstrong chose “logic smart” as a better summary term and it’s what I use in my book, teachings, and other blogs. You’ll hear Diana refer to this smart as “number smart.” And, you’ll hear her talk about how the smart includes skills and interests with numbers and with logic. If you’re a longtime follower of mine, don’t let this confuse you. She’s talking about the same smart I am.

Did your children learn their numbers before their letters? Did you notice them spontaneously counting things without being directed to do so? Do you remember your children asking questions at a young age and then continuing in that habit? How many of them wanted to understand how things work? Did they ever take anything apart to discover how it worked? These are all evidences of children being logic smart.

Constant questioning from logic-smart children can be annoying and exhausting when children are young. Preteens and teens with logic smart strengths who are not self-controlled can tend toward argumentative behavior. They can be a handful. They may keep asking why they’re not allowed to do something or why they have to do what you asked them to do. They may always want or need a rationale for your decision. You may have noticed one of their strengths is providing one for you as they logically try to convince you they’re right. It can be exhausting.

Yet, thinking in these ways is a strength based on a smart they must learn to use for good and not to do harm. Diana, as always, talks well about this. please listen. And, grab your kids to listen, too, so she can encourage them.

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Have you missed the smarts we’ve already covered? You can watch Diana’s videos here. And, you can read more about Diana and her curricula using the smarts at www.dianawaring.com.

Diana’s Biographical Sketch

Diana Waring is one of the pioneers of homeschooling. For nearly three decades she has been an author and speaker to the international homeschool movement. Diana is the author and publisher of the History Revealed curriculum, the Experience History Through Music series (William T. Anderson authored one of the titles in this series), Beyond Survival, Reaping the Harvest, and numerous world history and homeschool encouragement audio CDs. She is a video blogger, blogger, columnist for The Homeschool Minute, guest writer at The Old Schoolhouse magazine, curriculum writer, singer/composer, actress/playwright, wife, and homeschool mom. To learn more, please visit www.DianaWaring.com

Diana Waring Interviews “Picture Smart”

When you were a child, when did you feel smart? Think about that for a minute.

One of the reasons I love teaching about multiple intelligences and a main reason I wrote the book, 8 Great Smarts, is because there are far too many children who struggle in school and believe they are not smart. Also, they have great strengths but don’t think that means they’re smart. Depending upon your background you may believe the lie that you are not smart.

For instance, I imagine that people who remember coloring well and enjoying it when they were young didn’t necessarily feel smart because of it. Did you enjoy dot-to-dot books or mazes as a child? That’s because you’re picture smart. Was art one of your favorite classes? This is because you are picture smart. Did you enjoy and do well with maps, diagrams, and designs? Were your favorite assignments ones that involved drawing or creating? Are you creative today with color and design? You are picture smart. This smart could show up with the outfits you wear, or how you decorate your home, the way you display things on your desk, and even the way you plant flowers with a particular attention to the colors. There are so many ways to demonstrate you’re picture smart!

  • You’re not just creative – you’re smart!
  • You’re not just talented – you’re smart!
  • You’re not just good with colors – you’re smart!

At a speaking event yesterday I met a 63-year-old professional artist. She creates and sells beautiful oil paintings. I grieved with her when she told me that some people still ask her when she’s going to get a real job. This is probably the perspective of people who have the smarts most validated by the school system. They’re wrong and it’s sad and it’s among the reasons I’m glad you are here reading this blog.

Here you can watch Diana Waring’s video about being picture smart. Enjoy it. Choose to believe her. And then gather some children to watch it with you so you can talk about it. If you know any adults like my new 63-year-old friend please forward this to them with an encouragement from you. tell them you know they’re smart!

Diana’s Biographical Sketch

Diana Waring is one of the pioneers of homeschooling. For nearly three decades she has been an author and speaker to the international homeschool movement. Diana is the author and publisher of the History Revealed curriculum, the Experience History Through Music series (William T. Anderson authored one of the titles in this series), Beyond Survival, Reaping the Harvest, and numerous world history and homeschool encouragement audio CDs. She is a video blogger, blogger, columnist for The Homeschool Minute, guest writer at The Old Schoolhouse magazine, curriculum writer, singer/composer, actress/playwright, wife, and homeschool mom. To learn more, please visit www.DianaWaring.com

Diana Waring Interviews “Nature Smart”

Interests and abilities. They’re both valid when thinking about multiple intelligences. The ways we and our children are smart show up first as interests. Then, when these interests are responded to, abilities may follow. They may not. Or low ability may follow, but not high. It depends on God’s choice when creating us. right?

I have relatively high interest in some elements of nature, but not all. And, my abilities across the board aren’t strong. This is one of my less developed intelligences. What about you?

I’ve been on safari in Africa and here in the States, including at the fabulous Fossil Rim Wildlife Center near where I live. I go to our fabulous Fort Worth zoo often. I enjoy observing the animals. I don’t need to understand why they do what they do. I don’t need to remember which deer is which.

I appreciate brightly colored flowers and especially in beautiful arrangements. This is because my parents gardened well and my mom had a real talent for arranging flowers in vases. There’s an emotional interest here, but no personal ability.

When my brother and I were young, we caught a garden snake and built a cage to keep it for a while. I paid attention to it, but looking back it was more my logic smart that engaged me than being nature smart. I wanted to know how it lived in the burlap covering of our garden’s rose bush. How long had it been there? How did it survive in the winter? What did it eat? Were there other snakes under other burlap coverings that we didn’t notice when it warmed up and our dad took the burlap off? As I often write – smarts never work alone. They always partner for effectiveness.

You’ll enjoy this week’s video about being nature smart by my friend, Diana Waring. Listen to how she describes the strengths a nature-smart person has. What careers might interest them? Listen to what she believes makes someone great and not just good. I agree with her. Watch this with your kids, too, because it will give you much to talk about.

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Have you missed the smarts we’ve already covered? You can watch Diana’s videos here. And, you can read more about Diana and her curricula using the smarts at www.dianawaring.com.

Diana’s Biographical Sketch

Diana Waring is one of the pioneers of homeschooling. For nearly three decades she has been an author and speaker to the international homeschool movement. Diana is the author and publisher of the History Revealed curriculum, the Experience History Through Music series (William T. Anderson authored one of the titles in this series), Beyond Survival, Reaping the Harvest, and numerous world history and homeschool encouragement audio CDs. She is a video blogger, blogger, columnist for The Homeschool Minute, guest writer at The Old Schoolhouse magazine, curriculum writer, singer/composer, actress/playwright, wife, and homeschool mom. To learn more, please visit www.DianaWaring.com

Diana Waring Interviews “Word Smart”

Did you watch Diana Waring’s video about being body smart that I hosted on my blog last Wednesday? It was so important because far too many people believe children with this intelligence are not smart.

Today’s video (below) is about word smart – the one most people naturally think of when talking about intelligence. Children strong in this smart usually enjoy learning. School is a safe place for them.

I love how Diana reminds all of us that word smart shows up differently. That’s why I want you to watch the video with your children. They may be more word smart than they think they are.

There are my professional comedian friends, Christine and Sally. They can turn a phrase, dramatically pronounce or emphasize a word, and listen to what I think is a normal conversation and hear something humorous.

There’s my friend, Brad, who writes original birthday raps for his friends. He puts words together in the most unusual ways.

Ezra, my niece Katie’s husband, just designed my nephew’s wedding invitation. He’s word smart!

Diane reminded me of my grandfather and the speeches he gave. Both my brother and I take after him.

If you’re already familiar with the 8 great smarts, you might realize that in each of  my examples, at least one other intelligence is involved. The same is true with Diane’s examples. Intelligences rarely, if ever, work alone. When you listen to her examples, see if you can identify other relevant smarts. And, talk with your kids about who her examples remind them of. One more suggestion – listen for her comments about practice and how to do it well. I wholeheartedly agree!

{Note: if you can’t see the other smarts in our examples, don’t worry. I predict that you’ll be able to find them after watching all of Diana’s videos.}

Diana’s Biographical Sketch

Diana Waring is one of the pioneers of homeschooling. For nearly three decades she has been an author and speaker to the international homeschool movement. Diana is the author and publisher of the History Revealed curriculum, the Experience History Through Music series (William T. Anderson authored one of the titles in this series), Beyond Survival, Reaping the Harvest, and numerous world history and homeschool encouragement audio CDs. She is a video blogger, blogger, columnist for The Homeschool Minute, guest writer at The Old Schoolhouse magazine, curriculum writer, singer/composer, actress/playwright, wife, and homeschool mom.

Diana Waring’s Interviews “Body Smart”

Here’s the second blog about the smarts that ends with a brilliant, short video by  Diana Waring. Last week’s was the introduction. Today’s is about being body smart. Her video is so much fun. You’ll want to watch it with your children. I love what she says about how people who are body smart can use their strengths. Love it!

When being body smart, we think with movement and touch. This is why I may get great insights when working out in the fitness center with my trainer. You may think of new ideas while emptying the dish washer, folding laundry, driving to work, or walking up the stairs. What about your children?

Body-smart children learn best when we allow them to move. Keeping their hands busy helps. So often they’re told to “put that down” and “sit still and look at me.” For this and other reasons, way too many children with body-smart strengths don’t feel good about themselves. They often don’t believe they’re smart. This concerns me and I bet it concerns you.

Listen to Diana’s video with all of this is mind. Then watch it again with your kids and let Diana’s fun way of teaching truths stimulate a conversation. There’s great advice here you can use. Let us know how it goes!

Diana’s Biographical Sketch

Diana Waring is one of the pioneers of homeschooling. For nearly three decades she has been an author and speaker to the international homeschool movement. Diana is the author and publisher of the History Revealed curriculum, the Experience History Through Music series (William T. Anderson authored one of the titles in this series), Beyond Survival, Reaping the Harvest, and numerous world history and homeschool encouragement audio CDs. She is a video blogger, blogger, columnist for The Homeschool Minute, guest writer at The Old Schoolhouse magazine, curriculum writer, singer/composer, actress/playwright, wife, and homeschool mom.

The 8 Great Smarts with Diana Waring (Interview)

I’m super excited to welcome Diana Waring to my blog. I met Diana at a homeschool convention a number of years ago after hearing about her through homeschooling friends. She writes brilliant world history curriculum and uses the 8 great smarts to help children learn.

In this blog, you’ll get to know Diana. At the conclusion, please make sure to watch her short video that serves as an introduction to the smarts. Then watch it a second time with your children. In the next eight Wednesdays, I’ll share about each smart and I’ll share Diana’s clever and creative video about that smart. Again, you’ll want to watch with your children. The videos are set in the news studio and Diana plays both the reporter and the person with that smart who she interviews. You’ll love them!

Here we go … My interview with Diana Waring.

Before we get to specifics about multiple intelligences, tell us something about your beliefs about education, teaching, and learning.

If we start with a scriptural view—that it was our Creator’s plan that each person would begin life as a helpless baby, and that growing to adulthood would mean learning an enormous amount of information (including one’s culture, technology, social skills, history, and more)—searching for His design in how people learn becomes incredibly exciting! In the nearly 3 decades I’ve spent speaking and writing for the international homeschool movement, it’s become increasingly clear that a biblical education (one that conforms to God’s design) is “relational,” meaning it values:

  • the relationship between teacher and student (one of the most significant predictors of educational success);
  • the relationship between a student and the material being studied (engaging deeply rather than superficially so that learning is usable, memorable, and teachable);
  • the relationship between a student and God (learning in light of God’s Word and His ways, having it change one’s life).

You love history and have written and produced curriculum parents can use with their children. Why do you enjoy and value history? Why did you create your materials?

From the time I was a little girl, I heard stories of my grandfather (who worked for President Truman) and a great-great-great uncle (who invented the icebox). This made history seem “up close and personal”—more than a story, history was vividly real and incredibly interesting. In university, my absolute favorite courses were history and anthropology. So, as I began teaching my own children, when questions arose concerning ancient Egypt and Moses, an insatiable hunger grew to see how ancient civilizations and the Bible fit together. Once we started down that path, curiosity developed about how Church history influenced the Middle Ages, etc.. . .It was truly a domino effect!

As a speaker at homeschool conventions, I began to tell some of the amazing stories I was learning in this quest (like what the archaeological record helps us know about Jonah). People wanted the stories, so I began recording them. They then requested curriculum to help them dig deeper into the time periods, which set me on my quest for the past 20 years—to create a world history curriculum that would both honor the design for learning in each student AND discover the richness of His Story interwoven into the stories of antiquity through the mid-1950s.

Tell everybody about your love of music. Why have you used it with history? Why did you merge the two?

Music has been my joy since I was a child, singing in school programs and playing oboe in the school band. When my grandfather gave me his guitar, I found the way to both sing and play—as a folk singer!

When I discovered that fewer and fewer students knew the American folk songs we had grown up with, an idea came to teach the songs within their historic context. Families loved this History Through Music series, as it renewed the heritage of our country’s folk songs, while, at the same time, taught aspects of American history. Honestly, it makes the history come alive! (And, it’s a lot of fun!!)

Now, share with us about multiple intelligences. Why do you believe in their value? How did knowing about them influence your curriculum development?

I first learned about multiple intelligences in a Youth With A Mission school in Auckland, New Zealand. One of our teachers, Rosalie Pedder, had literally taught students around the world, and her firm belief was that EVERY person is smart in the ways God wired them. If students learn through multiple intelligences, they will succeed. As Rosalie combined lectures with multiple intelligence activities in our class, we all saw that something easy for one person was difficult for another.

As one who had always achieved top marks in school, I was startled to see the transformation for people who had always seen themselves as “stupid”—they suddenly discovered they were exceptionally good at learning when it came in non-traditional ways. And, I discovered that things these students found to be simple were very hard for me.

This way of looking at the various kinds of Smart became one of the significant structures in the next revision of my curriculum so that ALL students thrive in their learning.

Tell my blog readers how they can find out more about you and your curriculum/products.

Visit me at www.dianawaring.com where you will find my History Revealed curriculum, my History Through Music series, and much more! Thank you!

Now, watch this video for her fun introduction to the 8 great smarts. [NOTE: she refers to “logic smart” as “number smart.”]

Diana’s Biographical Sketch

Diana Waring is one of the pioneers of homeschooling. For nearly three decades she has been an author and speaker to the international homeschool movement. Diana is the author and publisher of the History Revealed curriculum, the Experience History Through Music series (William T. Anderson authored one of the titles in this series), Beyond Survival, Reaping the Harvest, and numerous world history and homeschool encouragement audio CDs. She is a video blogger, blogger, columnist for The Homeschool Minute, guest writer at The Old Schoolhouse magazine, curriculum writer, singer/composer, actress/playwright, wife, and homeschool mom.

 

Lessons From The Furnace – A Logic Smart Tale

I woke up at about 5:30 Friday morning. It didn’t take me long to figure out I was cold. Very cold.

I knew that the forecast called for a drastic drop in temperature from a day or two before, but I still felt colder than I thought I would. I soon realized why. From the sound my furnace was making, I figured out it wasn’t working.

Knowing I could do nothing about it so early in the day, I rolled over and was able to fall back to sleep.

The next time I woke up, I wasn’t able to fall back to sleep. But, it wasn’t due only to the cold.

My response to what I thought was a broken furnace made it too hard to sleep. Can you predict my thoughts? When would the repairman be able to come? What if many other people are already on the list for repairs? It’s Friday – if someone can’t come today I’ll have to pay more on the weekend. I leave soon on a trip so it’s got to get fixed. How much will it cost? Where will the money come from? … Perhaps you can relate.

I eventually made it out of bed and walked toward the thermostat because I was curious to see how cold it had gotten overnight. That’s when I saw a message, rather than the temperature, on the control panel.

Low battery.

Oh my goodness. I was instantly relieved. I found new batteries, exchanged the old for the new, and then read that it was 57°. The furnace instantly went to work heating my home. I praised God and relaxed. At the same time, I was disappointed in myself for being so pessimistic.

That night, at a Christmas celebration dinner, I told a friend, “I wish I would’ve had more faith and not had so many negative thoughts.”

Louise very kindly responded that she was sure most people would’ve reacted as I did.

Compassion. It’s a beautiful thing.

I believe most logic-smart people probably would have responded as I did. We are the ones who think with questions. We often begin analyzing situations before we have all the information. If we’re not careful, our pattern of thinking can become very negative. And, we can be guilty of trying to solve the problem independently of others.

As I often teach, thinking with questions isn’t a bad thing … it’s a logic-smart thing. I need to continually use this intelligence in good and healthy ways and reign it in when I feel it drags me down. I need to remember I’m an optimistic person. I shouldn’t forget that when I choose to use my logic-smart strengths.

Can you relate? Or, is this something to talk with your children about?

Let’s be smart with our smarts! And, let’s be compassionate toward ourselves and others. That’s smart!