Diana Waring Interviews “Picture Smart”

When you were a child, when did you feel smart? Think about that for a minute.

One of the reasons I love teaching about multiple intelligences and a main reason I wrote the book, 8 Great Smarts, is because there are far too many children who struggle in school and believe they are not smart. Also, they have great strengths but don’t think that means they’re smart. Depending upon your background you may believe the lie that you are not smart.

For instance, I imagine that people who remember coloring well and enjoying it when they were young didn’t necessarily feel smart because of it. Did you enjoy dot-to-dot books or mazes as a child? That’s because you’re picture smart. Was art one of your favorite classes? This is because you are picture smart. Did you enjoy and do well with maps, diagrams, and designs? Were your favorite assignments ones that involved drawing or creating? Are you creative today with color and design? You are picture smart. This smart could show up with the outfits you wear, or how you decorate your home, the way you display things on your desk, and even the way you plant flowers with a particular attention to the colors. There are so many ways to demonstrate you’re picture smart!

  • You’re not just creative – you’re smart!
  • You’re not just talented – you’re smart!
  • You’re not just good with colors – you’re smart!

At a speaking event yesterday I met a 63-year-old professional artist. She creates and sells beautiful oil paintings. I grieved with her when she told me that some people still ask her when she’s going to get a real job. This is probably the perspective of people who have the smarts most validated by the school system. They’re wrong and it’s sad and it’s among the reasons I’m glad you are here reading this blog.

Here you can watch Diana Waring’s video about being picture smart. Enjoy it. Choose to believe her. And then gather some children to watch it with you so you can talk about it. If you know any adults like my new 63-year-old friend please forward this to them with an encouragement from you. tell them you know they’re smart!

Diana’s Biographical Sketch

Diana Waring is one of the pioneers of homeschooling. For nearly three decades she has been an author and speaker to the international homeschool movement. Diana is the author and publisher of the History Revealed curriculum, the Experience History Through Music series (William T. Anderson authored one of the titles in this series), Beyond Survival, Reaping the Harvest, and numerous world history and homeschool encouragement audio CDs. She is a video blogger, blogger, columnist for The Homeschool Minute, guest writer at The Old Schoolhouse magazine, curriculum writer, singer/composer, actress/playwright, wife, and homeschool mom. To learn more, please visit www.DianaWaring.com

Diana Waring Interviews “Nature Smart”

Interests and abilities. They’re both valid when thinking about multiple intelligences. The ways we and our children are smart show up first as interests. Then, when these interests are responded to, abilities may follow. They may not. Or low ability may follow, but not high. It depends on God’s choice when creating us. right?

I have relatively high interest in some elements of nature, but not all. And, my abilities across the board aren’t strong. This is one of my less developed intelligences. What about you?

I’ve been on safari in Africa and here in the States, including at the fabulous Fossil Rim Wildlife Center near where I live. I go to our fabulous Fort Worth zoo often. I enjoy observing the animals. I don’t need to understand why they do what they do. I don’t need to remember which deer is which.

I appreciate brightly colored flowers and especially in beautiful arrangements. This is because my parents gardened well and my mom had a real talent for arranging flowers in vases. There’s an emotional interest here, but no personal ability.

When my brother and I were young, we caught a garden snake and built a cage to keep it for a while. I paid attention to it, but looking back it was more my logic smart that engaged me than being nature smart. I wanted to know how it lived in the burlap covering of our garden’s rose bush. How long had it been there? How did it survive in the winter? What did it eat? Were there other snakes under other burlap coverings that we didn’t notice when it warmed up and our dad took the burlap off? As I often write – smarts never work alone. They always partner for effectiveness.

You’ll enjoy this week’s video about being nature smart by my friend, Diana Waring. Listen to how she describes the strengths a nature-smart person has. What careers might interest them? Listen to what she believes makes someone great and not just good. I agree with her. Watch this with your kids, too, because it will give you much to talk about.

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Have you missed the smarts we’ve already covered? You can watch Diana’s videos here. And, you can read more about Diana and her curricula using the smarts at www.dianawaring.com.

Diana’s Biographical Sketch

Diana Waring is one of the pioneers of homeschooling. For nearly three decades she has been an author and speaker to the international homeschool movement. Diana is the author and publisher of the History Revealed curriculum, the Experience History Through Music series (William T. Anderson authored one of the titles in this series), Beyond Survival, Reaping the Harvest, and numerous world history and homeschool encouragement audio CDs. She is a video blogger, blogger, columnist for The Homeschool Minute, guest writer at The Old Schoolhouse magazine, curriculum writer, singer/composer, actress/playwright, wife, and homeschool mom. To learn more, please visit www.DianaWaring.com

Diana Waring Interviews “Word Smart”

Did you watch Diana Waring’s video about being body smart that I hosted on my blog last Wednesday? It was so important because far too many people believe children with this intelligence are not smart.

Today’s video (below) is about word smart – the one most people naturally think of when talking about intelligence. Children strong in this smart usually enjoy learning. School is a safe place for them.

I love how Diana reminds all of us that word smart shows up differently. That’s why I want you to watch the video with your children. They may be more word smart than they think they are.

There are my professional comedian friends, Christine and Sally. They can turn a phrase, dramatically pronounce or emphasize a word, and listen to what I think is a normal conversation and hear something humorous.

There’s my friend, Brad, who writes original birthday raps for his friends. He puts words together in the most unusual ways.

Ezra, my niece Katie’s husband, just designed my nephew’s wedding invitation. He’s word smart!

Diane reminded me of my grandfather and the speeches he gave. Both my brother and I take after him.

If you’re already familiar with the 8 great smarts, you might realize that in each of  my examples, at least one other intelligence is involved. The same is true with Diane’s examples. Intelligences rarely, if ever, work alone. When you listen to her examples, see if you can identify other relevant smarts. And, talk with your kids about who her examples remind them of. One more suggestion – listen for her comments about practice and how to do it well. I wholeheartedly agree!

{Note: if you can’t see the other smarts in our examples, don’t worry. I predict that you’ll be able to find them after watching all of Diana’s videos.}

Diana’s Biographical Sketch

Diana Waring is one of the pioneers of homeschooling. For nearly three decades she has been an author and speaker to the international homeschool movement. Diana is the author and publisher of the History Revealed curriculum, the Experience History Through Music series (William T. Anderson authored one of the titles in this series), Beyond Survival, Reaping the Harvest, and numerous world history and homeschool encouragement audio CDs. She is a video blogger, blogger, columnist for The Homeschool Minute, guest writer at The Old Schoolhouse magazine, curriculum writer, singer/composer, actress/playwright, wife, and homeschool mom.

Diana Waring’s Interviews “Body Smart”

Here’s the second blog about the smarts that ends with a brilliant, short video by  Diana Waring. Last week’s was the introduction. Today’s is about being body smart. Her video is so much fun. You’ll want to watch it with your children. I love what she says about how people who are body smart can use their strengths. Love it!

When being body smart, we think with movement and touch. This is why I may get great insights when working out in the fitness center with my trainer. You may think of new ideas while emptying the dish washer, folding laundry, driving to work, or walking up the stairs. What about your children?

Body-smart children learn best when we allow them to move. Keeping their hands busy helps. So often they’re told to “put that down” and “sit still and look at me.” For this and other reasons, way too many children with body-smart strengths don’t feel good about themselves. They often don’t believe they’re smart. This concerns me and I bet it concerns you.

Listen to Diana’s video with all of this is mind. Then watch it again with your kids and let Diana’s fun way of teaching truths stimulate a conversation. There’s great advice here you can use. Let us know how it goes!

Diana’s Biographical Sketch

Diana Waring is one of the pioneers of homeschooling. For nearly three decades she has been an author and speaker to the international homeschool movement. Diana is the author and publisher of the History Revealed curriculum, the Experience History Through Music series (William T. Anderson authored one of the titles in this series), Beyond Survival, Reaping the Harvest, and numerous world history and homeschool encouragement audio CDs. She is a video blogger, blogger, columnist for The Homeschool Minute, guest writer at The Old Schoolhouse magazine, curriculum writer, singer/composer, actress/playwright, wife, and homeschool mom.

The 8 Great Smarts with Diana Waring (Interview)

I’m super excited to welcome Diana Waring to my blog. I met Diana at a homeschool convention a number of years ago after hearing about her through homeschooling friends. She writes brilliant world history curriculum and uses the 8 great smarts to help children learn.

In this blog, you’ll get to know Diana. At the conclusion, please make sure to watch her short video that serves as an introduction to the smarts. Then watch it a second time with your children. In the next eight Wednesdays, I’ll share about each smart and I’ll share Diana’s clever and creative video about that smart. Again, you’ll want to watch with your children. The videos are set in the news studio and Diana plays both the reporter and the person with that smart who she interviews. You’ll love them!

Here we go … My interview with Diana Waring.

Before we get to specifics about multiple intelligences, tell us something about your beliefs about education, teaching, and learning.

If we start with a scriptural view—that it was our Creator’s plan that each person would begin life as a helpless baby, and that growing to adulthood would mean learning an enormous amount of information (including one’s culture, technology, social skills, history, and more)—searching for His design in how people learn becomes incredibly exciting! In the nearly 3 decades I’ve spent speaking and writing for the international homeschool movement, it’s become increasingly clear that a biblical education (one that conforms to God’s design) is “relational,” meaning it values:

  • the relationship between teacher and student (one of the most significant predictors of educational success);
  • the relationship between a student and the material being studied (engaging deeply rather than superficially so that learning is usable, memorable, and teachable);
  • the relationship between a student and God (learning in light of God’s Word and His ways, having it change one’s life).

You love history and have written and produced curriculum parents can use with their children. Why do you enjoy and value history? Why did you create your materials?

From the time I was a little girl, I heard stories of my grandfather (who worked for President Truman) and a great-great-great uncle (who invented the icebox). This made history seem “up close and personal”—more than a story, history was vividly real and incredibly interesting. In university, my absolute favorite courses were history and anthropology. So, as I began teaching my own children, when questions arose concerning ancient Egypt and Moses, an insatiable hunger grew to see how ancient civilizations and the Bible fit together. Once we started down that path, curiosity developed about how Church history influenced the Middle Ages, etc.. . .It was truly a domino effect!

As a speaker at homeschool conventions, I began to tell some of the amazing stories I was learning in this quest (like what the archaeological record helps us know about Jonah). People wanted the stories, so I began recording them. They then requested curriculum to help them dig deeper into the time periods, which set me on my quest for the past 20 years—to create a world history curriculum that would both honor the design for learning in each student AND discover the richness of His Story interwoven into the stories of antiquity through the mid-1950s.

Tell everybody about your love of music. Why have you used it with history? Why did you merge the two?

Music has been my joy since I was a child, singing in school programs and playing oboe in the school band. When my grandfather gave me his guitar, I found the way to both sing and play—as a folk singer!

When I discovered that fewer and fewer students knew the American folk songs we had grown up with, an idea came to teach the songs within their historic context. Families loved this History Through Music series, as it renewed the heritage of our country’s folk songs, while, at the same time, taught aspects of American history. Honestly, it makes the history come alive! (And, it’s a lot of fun!!)

Now, share with us about multiple intelligences. Why do you believe in their value? How did knowing about them influence your curriculum development?

I first learned about multiple intelligences in a Youth With A Mission school in Auckland, New Zealand. One of our teachers, Rosalie Pedder, had literally taught students around the world, and her firm belief was that EVERY person is smart in the ways God wired them. If students learn through multiple intelligences, they will succeed. As Rosalie combined lectures with multiple intelligence activities in our class, we all saw that something easy for one person was difficult for another.

As one who had always achieved top marks in school, I was startled to see the transformation for people who had always seen themselves as “stupid”—they suddenly discovered they were exceptionally good at learning when it came in non-traditional ways. And, I discovered that things these students found to be simple were very hard for me.

This way of looking at the various kinds of Smart became one of the significant structures in the next revision of my curriculum so that ALL students thrive in their learning.

Tell my blog readers how they can find out more about you and your curriculum/products.

Visit me at www.dianawaring.com where you will find my History Revealed curriculum, my History Through Music series, and much more! Thank you!

Now, watch this video for her fun introduction to the 8 great smarts. [NOTE: she refers to “logic smart” as “number smart.”]

Diana’s Biographical Sketch

Diana Waring is one of the pioneers of homeschooling. For nearly three decades she has been an author and speaker to the international homeschool movement. Diana is the author and publisher of the History Revealed curriculum, the Experience History Through Music series (William T. Anderson authored one of the titles in this series), Beyond Survival, Reaping the Harvest, and numerous world history and homeschool encouragement audio CDs. She is a video blogger, blogger, columnist for The Homeschool Minute, guest writer at The Old Schoolhouse magazine, curriculum writer, singer/composer, actress/playwright, wife, and homeschool mom.

 

Lessons From The Furnace – A Logic Smart Tale

I woke up at about 5:30 Friday morning. It didn’t take me long to figure out I was cold. Very cold.

I knew that the forecast called for a drastic drop in temperature from a day or two before, but I still felt colder than I thought I would. I soon realized why. From the sound my furnace was making, I figured out it wasn’t working.

Knowing I could do nothing about it so early in the day, I rolled over and was able to fall back to sleep.

The next time I woke up, I wasn’t able to fall back to sleep. But, it wasn’t due only to the cold.

My response to what I thought was a broken furnace made it too hard to sleep. Can you predict my thoughts? When would the repairman be able to come? What if many other people are already on the list for repairs? It’s Friday – if someone can’t come today I’ll have to pay more on the weekend. I leave soon on a trip so it’s got to get fixed. How much will it cost? Where will the money come from? … Perhaps you can relate.

I eventually made it out of bed and walked toward the thermostat because I was curious to see how cold it had gotten overnight. That’s when I saw a message, rather than the temperature, on the control panel.

Low battery.

Oh my goodness. I was instantly relieved. I found new batteries, exchanged the old for the new, and then read that it was 57°. The furnace instantly went to work heating my home. I praised God and relaxed. At the same time, I was disappointed in myself for being so pessimistic.

That night, at a Christmas celebration dinner, I told a friend, “I wish I would’ve had more faith and not had so many negative thoughts.”

Louise very kindly responded that she was sure most people would’ve reacted as I did.

Compassion. It’s a beautiful thing.

I believe most logic-smart people probably would have responded as I did. We are the ones who think with questions. We often begin analyzing situations before we have all the information. If we’re not careful, our pattern of thinking can become very negative. And, we can be guilty of trying to solve the problem independently of others.

As I often teach, thinking with questions isn’t a bad thing … it’s a logic-smart thing. I need to continually use this intelligence in good and healthy ways and reign it in when I feel it drags me down. I need to remember I’m an optimistic person. I shouldn’t forget that when I choose to use my logic-smart strengths.

Can you relate? Or, is this something to talk with your children about?

Let’s be smart with our smarts! And, let’s be compassionate toward ourselves and others. That’s smart!

Christmas + Children = Play Time! Here’s How The 8 Great Smarts Can Facilitiate The Joy

Christmas and children – they just go together, don’t they? Perhaps you’re looking forward to spending time with children and teens later this month. Maybe you’re still shopping for their gifts. You’re not alone. Stores are still full. Website traffic is high.

Games and toys are some of the best ways to awaken and even strengthen their eight great smarts. Here’s a short list of suggestions taken from the end of each chapter of 8 Great Smarts.

Shop strategically. If you don’t know how the children are smart just pick one or two that sound interesting. If you do know, think about whether they’d enjoy a game for a smart they’re already developing or whether to buy one to better awaken one they haven’t used as much. Or, buy both!

Word Smart – Let’s Play!

Play Scattergories: If you can quickly come up with a list of, say, things at the park, in a drawer, and that you wear that start with the letter t that no one else thinks of, you can win this game.

Play Apples to Apples: One player draws a card. Each player selects a word card from their hand that they think is most relevant to the word on that card. If the judge picks your card, you win that round. Unlikely connections among words make for lots of laughter!

Logic Smart – Let’s Play!

Play Blokus: Players take turns placing pieces of their chosen color on the board. It’s tricky because each new piece must touch at least one other piece of the same color, but only at the corners. You win if you place more pieces than anyone else.

Play Clue: Crack the murder that took place in the mansion by asking the right questions to win this classic game. Junior version available.

Picture Smart – Let’s Play!

Play Telestrations: Picture the “Telephone Game” using drawings instead of whispering something into your neighbor’s ear. Lots of laughter.

Play Pictionary: Make quick sketches that others will hopefully guess correctly. Junior version available

Music Smart – Let’s Play!

Play Cranium: Answer trivia questions, create art, hum, act out clues, and use your vocabulary skills to win. Relevant to many smarts.

Play Encore: Draw a card with a word on it and sing at least six words of a song with that word in it. Judges memory, not musical ability.

Body Smart – Let’s Play!

Play tag (or any outdoor game).

Play Twister: Give the spinner a whirl and follow the directions. Just try to keep from falling over!

Nature Smart – Let’s Play!

Play Qwirkle: Match colors and shapes and use wise maneuvers and a strategy to win.

Play Rock On Geology Game: Rock and mineral collection includes fifteen specimens and fifty-plus polished rocks and minerals; five levels of play.

People Smart – Let’s Play!

Play Headbanz: Everyone but you knows what role you’ve been assigned. Ask questions to try to figure it out before you run out of time. You could be a mouse, dirty sock, or cash register.

Play Guesstures: You only have a few seconds to use classic charades techniques to get your team to guess the word on your assigned card.

Self Smart – Let’s Play!

Do quiet things together that your child chooses, such as completing a puzzle, coloring, building with Legos, playing with dolls, or playing a car game like “Who Am I?”

Shop, shop, shop! Play, play, play!

Knowing The 8 Great “Smarts” Reveals Your Child’s Strengths

It made my heart smile.

I love the way Leigh expresses herself here in what was a Facebook post. Read about her nature-smart son, Josiah. I love that she knows him this well and knows that what he’s doing is important and evidence of intelligence. I’m grateful for moms like Leigh and readers like you who I’m privileged to influence.

Thank you for reminding us that our kids are smart in different ways. My 10-yr-old can make wood kindling like nobody’s business. After a stressful day of a particularly tough subject, I found my son doing goat chores without being asked and then making small piles of wood starter for our wood stove. It made my heart smile knowing that by some school test-standard, he may have lagged behind but in his nature smarts he’s far beyond! Thank you for all you do to spur us on toward love and good deeds.

I was humbled to read her last statement because it’s my joy to share through speaking and my books and other materials. I almost didn’t share this here, but I wanted to see if this testimonial would make your heart smile, too. Also, here is a relevant question:

If you are not familiar with the 8 Great Smarts, click here to learn more and get your copy. If you’re already familiar with the 8 Great Smarts, how can knowing about them “spur you on toward love and good deeds”?

A Great Season To Be Nature Smart!

Let’s take advantage of the weather and get outside with our kids. We’ll all become more nature smart. It’s not hard.

We don’t have to think about “doing” a lot. Sometimes, it’s just “talking” a lot that matters. We can talk when walking in a park or around the block. Strategic conversations in the car can be important. Hanging out together is what matters.

Just ask:

  • How many adjectives can we think of to describe the color of the leaves?
  • What words describe how all the leaves you’re raking smell? What does the smell remind you of?
  • How would you describe the wind you hear? What words paint the best picture? Do you hear any musical instruments in the sounds?
  • How does the wind feel when you’re outside?
  • Describe the shapes you see over here. The pinecones are oval. What else? Do you see any circles, squares, or triangles?
  • What can you see that’s alive?
  • What can you discover that’s dead that used to be alive?
  • What’s never been alive?
  • Let’s study the clouds. Do they remind you of anything?
  • Where would you love to go exploring? What do you hope you find?
  • Let’s make up a story about the animals who have walked in this grass.
  • In what ways is weather powerful?
  • What questions would you like to ask me about the out-of-doors?

Let’s be nature smart this month!

Building “Smarts” Bridges In School

As most of us can attest from first-hand experience, middle school has never been all that easy to navigate. The academic expectations of different teachers and the increased stress that high school is right around the corner can negatively affect middle schoolers. Also, relationships can be confusing and exhausting.

I was recently reminded that when students know how they are smart, they can also identify how their peers are smart. If they’re confident and raised to be other-centered, they can share their insights  and have a positive impact on their peers.

I was encouraged by my friend’s story and I think you will be, too. I need to start by sharing that last spring, her son willingly on his own, read How Am I Smart? (I’ve refreshed this as 8 Great Smarts.)

My friend’s son is now a 14-year-old 8th grader. He recently came home from school and told his mom, “Mom, my friend J said he was stupid today. So I had to tell him about all the ways to be smart.”

My friend:  “What did J think?”

Her son: “He never thought about any way to be smart except word and logic smart. I talked to him about how body smart he is. I think he felt better after we talked. J isn’t stupid, he is smart in his own way.”

This mom shared these additional thoughts with me: The really cool thing is my boy is a kid who tries to do things athletically but is really wired for academics and music. And his friend J is a boy who struggles academically but is VERY gifted athletically. The info that you gave him through your book builds bridges between kids who are gifted really differently. So thank you for that!

Are you encouraged? If you are, what can you do now to create a similar experience for your kids?